Welcome to The Phoenix Files!

This blog is a collection of papers and how-to articles I have written over the past 25+ years, as well as my travel journals and announcements.  Scholarly works from "The Library" on my old website, are labeled here as "Historica Tractatu." 

My travels have had heavy influence on my work and are the 'back story' behind many of my designs. Some of my older journals are revised from the original, and most link to photo albums on Facebook.  

Names from the History of Archers

This index is a list of names from The History of the Nation of the Archers by Grigor of Akanc, written in 1271 in Cilicia at Akanc' and preserved at the Armenian Convent of St. James at Jerusalem. The Armenian text was, translated by Robert D. Blake and Richard N. Frye. I located this work in the Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, Vol. 2, No. 3-4, published by the Harvard-Yenching Institute in December 1949. It is provided here as a resource for historians, heralds, reenactors and gamers.

These names and nouns are in alphabetical order, and are denoted by gender (m/f) or as a noun (n). Page numbers are provided as reference. The default language is Armenian. If the name has a translation or language equivalent, that is also noted, followed by the page number of that reference.


Other notes of interest from this text:

  • Khans were killed by strangulation by bowstring. It was against Mongolian law to shed royal blood.
  • Iarlax was a gold tablet granted by the khan, exempting the bearer from a specific number of crimes.
  • Legend has it that the Yassa, the laws govering the Mongols, were handed down to Chinghis Khan by a golden eagle. For the scope and content of the Yassa, see the Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies Number 3, 1938.

Name

Male

Female

Neutral

Page #

Language

Translation

A


Abaga

x

 

 

103

Mongolian

Uncle on pg 135

Angurag

 

 

 

35

 

 

Aq Buga

 

 

x

119

Turkish

White Bull,  spelled Agbuga on pg. 135-6

Aradamur

 

 

x

138

Turkish

Iron Man

Argun

x

 

 

57

Turkish

 

Asakert

 

 

x

 

 

Student

Asar

x

 

 

35

Mongolian

 

Asut'u

x

 

 

35, 141

 

 

Awgawt'ay

x

 

 

35

 

Ogodei may be the Mongolian equivalent pg. 141

Aylt'ana

 

x

 

33

 

Altani (Crimson) Ai Altan (Crimson Gold) are the Mongolian equivalents pg. 142

B


Bač'u Nuin

x

 

 

35, 119

Turkish

Baiju Noyan is the Mongolian equivalent pg. 143

Nuin / Noyan means Prince, the Armenian reference is on pg. 137

Bahatur

 

 

x

121

 

Hero or Champion. Also Bagatur (Mongolian), Batur (Turkish), Goratbipb (Russian), Bahadur (modern Persian), Baxtawor (Armenian)

Berk'ē

 

 

x

148

 

Bärkä (Turkish / Mongolian for a hostage), Berke (Mongolian for difficult)

Balaxē

x

 

 

59

 

Bulgai is the Mongolian equivalent pg.146

Bawragan

x

 

 

59

 

Boragan (The Little Brown) is the Mongolian equivalent pg. 147

Bawra

x

 

 

51

 

Bora (The Brown Face) is the Mongolian equivalent pg. 146

Benal

x

 

 

29

 

Bainal is the Mongolian equivalent, possibly Nestorian pg. 148

C


C'agatay

x

 

 

35

 

Having White. Kagatai (The White One) is the Mongolian equivalent pg. 149-150

C'awrmagan

 

 

 

151

 

Cormagan is the Mongolian equivalent, I suspect it may be the female equivalent for C'awman / Corman

C'awrman

x

 

 

29

 

Corman is the Mongolian equivalent pg. 152

E


Elci

 

 

x

121

 

Messenger

H


Hulawu

x

 

 

59, 151

 

Hulegu is the Mongolian equivalent pg. 154

J


Jam

 

 

x

121

 

Postal Relay (i.e. Pony Express)

Jarguci

 

 

x

121

 

Judge

K


Kesig

 

 

x

121

 

Mongolian (The Guard of the Sovereign). Also Kazik (Turkish), Tacik (Armenian)

K'ēsikt'oyk

 

 

x

77

 

Palace guards armored with sword and bow.

Kesigtu is the Mongolian equivalent for Imperial Guard.

K'it'buga

x

 

 

81, 154-5

Turkish

 

M


Mal

 

 

x

171

 

A tax of 20 silver coins

Manku

x

 

 

57

 

Mangu qan (Turkish) pg 155. Manggu is the Turkish equivalent, Möngke is the Mongolian pg. 120, Mongke Qagan is also Mongolian according to this text, though typically you see K rather than Q spellings in Mongolian. Qagan, Qan, are equivalents to the Mongolian Khan or Khagan.

Migan

x

 

 

63

 

Migan (flesh, meat) is the Mongolian equivalent pg. 155

Mular

x

 

 

29

 

Also listed on pg. 156 as Molar or Molur (Crystal), Bolar Mecin (Monkey), Becin

N


Nekuder

 

 

x

159

Persian

The Slave

Nuxak'awun

 

 

 

156-7

 

Nogai Ko'un (Dog Son) is the Mongolian equivalent

Q


Qatagan (m) pg. 59 Mongolian pg. 153

 

 

 

 

 

 

S


Sadun

x

 

 

79

 

 

Sayin (m) pg. 45

x

 

 

45

 

Good or fine. Also Mongolian  for salt offering, religious pg. 157

Siramun

x

 

 

51, 109

 

 

T


Tagar

 

 

x

171

 

Tax on grain. 1 taghar = 750 Russian pounds

T'agudar

x

 

 

59

 

The Perfect pg. 156-7,  Teguder may be the Mongolian equivalent pg. 156-7

Tamači

 

 

x

120

Mongolian

A class of knight or cavalier

Tawvus

 

x

 

73

Turkish / Persian

Peacock, Togus is the Mongolian equivalent pg. 160-62

T'enal

 

 

 

35

 

Tainal is the Mongolian equivalent pg. 162

Tut'ar

x

 

 

59

 

 

Tut'tu

 

 

 

35

 

 

Q


Qara Buga

x

 

 

29

 

Tara Buya (Black Bull) is the Turkish / Mongolian equivalent

V


Vardapet

 

 

x

 

 

Teacher

X


Xojay

 

 

 

35

 

 

Xul

x

 

 

164

 

Qul (Slave) is the Turkish equivalent

Xunan

 

 

x

35

 

Qunan (3 year old, usually refers to an animal) Mongolian pg. 165

Xurumc'I

 

 

 

35

 

Qurumsi, the name of a Mohammedan clan pg. 165

Xut't'u

x

 

 

35

 

Qutugtu (Saint) appears to be the Mongolian equivalent pg. 167

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